Short essay on tree plantation – PLANING A TREE

Short essay on tree plantation
PLANING A TREE (BH&G. P. 70, by Barbara Damrosch)

PLANING A TREE
Photographer: Ameer Basheer | Source: Unsplash

Choose the right species, give it a good start, and you'll have a lifelong companion.

One of the great joys of owning a home is planing a tree. It not only creates a sense of permanence but also is an investment that pays off in added curb appeal, shade, privacy, or fruit. Before you grab the first crabapple that catches your eye, though, check with your local extension service or nursery to zero in on the right tree for your needs, climate, and yard size. Also consider a young tree over a maturer one. It will cost less, be easier to plant and adapt more readily to its new home. When determining the planting spot, remember that most tree types won't tolerate waterlogged ground and deep shade. You will also want to leave at least 15 feet between the house and the tree more if the tree will be broad to avoid any damage to your roof or walls.

NATIVE TREES

Because they've adapted to our habitats, North American natives often require less care and benefit our region's wildlife. Our expert Barbara Damrosch suggests the following as well suited to today's more compact yards.

NORTHEAST

+Washington hawthorn

+American hornbeam

+Shadblow Serviceberry

SOUTHEAST

+Eastern redbud

+Two-winged silverbell

+Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida)

SOUTHWEST

+Blue palo verde

+Western redbud

MIDWEST

+'Winter King' green hawthorn

+Red Buckeye

+Pawpaw

NORTHWEST

+Pacific godwood

+Vine maple

+Sastatoon serviceberry

PLANING A TREE, Nurseries sell trees three ways. Each calls for a slightly different planting technique. (BH&G. P. 70, by Barbara Damrosch)

1. Balled and burlapped

These trees come with a fragile root ball still in this growing soil wrapped in burlap. Balled-and-burlapped trees are more difficult to plant because they're heavy and you want to prevent soil from breaking off, which would expose their vulnerable roots to air. The trick to planting them right on the first try:

DIG THE HOLE

Measure the root ball. dig a hole that is as deep as the root ball height and twice as wide. To check the depth, lay a stick across the hole, right, and measure the distance to the bottom.

ENSURE THE RIGHT DEPTH

Measuring is important but not foolproof. To prevent planing too deeply, set sod clumps in the hole. Pull them out from under the ball to lower it as needed. Once positioned, cut and fold back some of the ball's burlap, twine, and, if present, wire cage.

2. CONTAINER GROWN

To plant a tree grown in a nursery container, dig a hole the same depth as the soil in the pot and twice as wide. If the tree is root bound, poke a knife into any circling, matted roots to separate them. Plant so the root flare )at the base of the trunk) is uncovered with no bark beneath the soil.

3. BARE ROOT

The most affordable option, these dormant trees come with moist packing material around their roots. Just before planting, swish roots in a slurry of soil and water. Dig a hole as deep and wide as the longest roots, mound soild in the center, and spread roots down the mound sides. Fill the hole, patting firmly to avoid air pockets and making sure al the trunk is above the soil.

We would like to recommend a BRAND NEW Plow, Hoe Tool, Planting Gardening Tool, Ho Mi

Ho Mi
Ho Mi – All In One Gardening Tool

Homi (Korean: 호미), also known as a Korean hand plow,[1][2] is a short-handled traditional farming tool used by Koreans.[3][4][5] It is a farming tool that removes grasses from paddies and fields.[6] It is also used when plowing a rice field, planting seeds, plowing up soil, and digging potatoes in fields. It is a farming tool inspired by the hoe. It is an important extension of agriculture from the ancient times because the homi was excavated in the Bronze Age historic site of the Pyeongnam Mangsan Daepyeong-ri and the early Iron Age historic site of Yangpyong, Gyeonggi Province.[7]

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PLANING A TREE

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